Historian of the Hunted//Achebe

I will speak for the silent
For the quiet & meek
For lions without historians
When their time is most bleak
I will speak for the mothers
Whose children are deep
Six feet under earth
Their hearts aching in grief

 

 

I dare to speak up for the ones who are silent
The perished
The dead
Who were taken by violence
By hatred so evil It sets off the sirens
In hearts of the many
Affected by climate
Imposed by the powers
Want life for us, gory
Oppress us & kill us
Then rewrite our stories
Use ignorant persons
To push their agendas
Then blame them
Condemn them
Say it’s their dilemma
Real narratives living
On tongues of the spared
So shook they stay quiet
They bury despair
Their silence a guise
That shields them from torture
But the truth beats them harder
Than any enforcer
It crawls up their throats
In the night as they sleep
Wake up soaked in fear
And they weep, and they weep
I will speak for the silent
For the quiet & meek
For lions without historians
When their time is most bleak
I will speak for the mothers
Whose children are deep
Six feet under earth
Their hearts aching in grief
I will speak for Aleppo
For Flint
For Treyvon
I will speak up for Hamza
And baby Aylan
I will speak up for Deah Yusor & Razan
I will speak for Ciara
Those who’ve done nothing wrong

I will speak for those sinking
In deep seas of sorrows
Holding hope in their palm
For a brighter tomorrow
It is they who push me
To be great
To be proud
I will speak for them loud
No guise and no shroud

I will speak, I will speak
‘Til I can’t speak no more
And when that day comes
Some must take up the chore
Show them to be louder
Teach the children their voice
Of resilience is power
Tell them all to make noise
They must speak for the silent
There is no other choice
They must fall on all ears
Then one day we’ll rejoice
In a land known as paradise
Prepped for arrival
Of those who have fought
For what’s right
What is vital
For humanity
Love
For what makes us all great
On that day we will rest
No more pain
No more hate


Shukri Janagale (Artist) resides in Garowe by way of Toronto, Canada. Since her return to her homeland, Somalia, she has been blessed with a sense of peace. This is the healthiest she has ever felt, spiritually, physically, emotionally and mentally. This nuance of balance has ignited a surge of creativity that Shukri hasn’t experienced since her adolescence. Due to her experiences she has chosen to make Garowe, Somalia her home base. In an attempt to alter the negative perceptions of her country and inspire other diaspora members to return home, Shukri has chosen to challenge her private nature and share her experiences via Instagram. Her Art Work focuses on the abstract human portrait. Due to religious reasons, her paintings are devoid of eyes. The absence of eyes adds another layer of depth to her subjects; it’s as if the void serves as a layer of protection to the windows of the soul. You will find bright contrasting colors and black are reoccurring themes in her work.
Digital portfoliohttps://janagale.crevado.com
Instagram@cushiticqueen
Hanan Hassan (Author): The poem is inspired by Nigerian poet, novelist and critic Chinua Achebe. He was once quoted stating “Until the lions have their own historians, the history of the hunt will always glorify the hunter”. This quote resonated with me as a young Somali woman in America. Through my written works, I dare to speak up for those who aren’t allowed the space.

Instagram: @onedesertflower

Somali Proverbs

My people say to leave what is on this side for the flood
And to leave what is on that side for the wind:

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My people are beautiful:
They say if people come together they can mend a crack in the sky.
My people are funny:
They say tea is for men and talk is for women.
My people are naïve:
They say a broken tradition angers God.
My people are nomads:
They say a man prolonging his life sees a camel give birth.
My people are wise:
They say these youth taught their mother to give birth.
My people are lovers:
They say a thousand assignations, one marriage.
My people are honest:
They say there is no life without a women.
My people say to leave what is on this side for the flood
And to leave what is on that side for the wind:
My people have been left in the past.


Nuura Axmed (Artist) posts poetry and personal essays about identity, mental health, and travel at her blog Thoughts of a Big Head. Nuura is also a visual artist who focuses on the attire (hijab) of her subjects, and the overall mood of the piece, in lieu of emphasizing facial features. She enjoys taking photographs of her grandmother, and making digital edits on her phone. She resides in London.

The above artwork is titled: Macooyo and the First Granddaughter

Instagram: @wordsbynourz

Ali Hagi (Author) is a Somali male living in San Diego, California. He is 28 years of age and was born in Qooryooley, Somalia during the civil war. His family fled and lived in refugee camps in neighboring Kenya until they were granted entrance to the US as refugees in 1993. Ali took some time off from school to find his place and figure things out. He is now pursuing a Bachelors degree in English Literature, Insha’Allah. Ali is an avid reader and writer and has been writing poetry from a young age. He takes inspiration from poets he reads as well as the stories and poetry of his grandfather, Muhammad Omar Dage, a renowned poet in his own right. Ali plans to pursue a career in writing and publish a collection of poetry as well as a novel in the near future, Insha’Allah.

Diinkii Dhaanshey

“Diinkii Dhaanshey” (The Turtle Fetched a Pail of Water) is an idiom that hooyo always said to us when we were being lazy.  It’s taken from this story about a tortoise.

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“Diinkii Dhaanshey” (The Turtle Fetched a Pail of Water) is an idiom that hooyo always said to us when we were being lazy.  It’s taken from this story about a tortoise:
During a drought, a tortoise was sent to collect water from a well. He was presumed to have left. The other animals waited and waited until finally one day the tortoise was spotted. The animals cried in relief, “Oh! He’s back!”To which the tortoise replied, “Actually, I’m still on my way.”


Asha Mohamed (Artist) is an illustrator and aspiring writer studying for a Masters degree in Psychology. She curates and co-produces Literary Natives, an organisation dedicated to championing Writers of Colour. Asha resides in London.

Find more of Asha’s work, and purchase prints, at ashaillustrates.com 

Twitter: @baahramewe
Instagram: @baahramewe

Dhambaal Ka Socda Jilka Dhalan Doona

47 - Nujum Ahmed Hashi for Khaled M. Saed

“Hadallo ka soo baxaya af aan wali dilaacin, fikiro dhex mushaaxaya maskax aan wali amabaqaadin, indho aan wali ifka u soo bixin, jidh aan dareemin milica cadceeda, san aan wali carfin udduga ubaxa, Haddana qaabaynaya nolosha uu ku noolaan lahaa.”

Laga yaabaa in la idiin kala sheekeeyay, laga yaabaa in aad ku kortay deegaan ku xardhan midabyo kala duwan, laga yaabaa in aad qol madow ugu jirto beelaysi aan macno ku fadhiyin, laga yaabaa inaad fikirkaaga iyo cududaada siisay siyaasi aan dantiisa moogayn, laga yaabaa in aanad wali u soo if bixin quruxda dabiiciga ah ee adduunka, laga yaabaa in aanad wali indho dilaacsan oo fikirka tolmoon aad ka arag la’dahay, laga yaabaa in aad ka hayaantay dhulkaagii Hooyo, laga yaabaa in aad ka nixisay hooyo u heelanayd horumarkaaga, laga yaabaa in aad ka farxisay danayste aan dan kaa lahayn, laga yaabaa in aad musuqmaasuq ka carartay, laga yaabaa in aad cadaalad darro ka cadhootay, laga yaabaa inaad u fikiri wayday si togan, laga yaabaa inaad isleedahay ii hiili, laga yaabaa in lagu jiho wareeriyay ood kala garan wayday jiho aad u socoto, laga yaabaa in hore aan looga fikirin aayahaaga danbe, laga yaabaa in aad walaalkaa u damqan wayday, laga yaabaa in aad ka wayday garabkaad ku lahayd, laga yaabaa inaad ku gubatay dab shisheeye dhigay, laga yaabaa in aad ii garaabi waydo.

balse hadaladan aan ku hadlayaa waa hadalo ka soo baxaya af aan wali dilaacin, fikiro dhex mushaaxaya maskax aan wali amabaqaadin, indho aan wali ifka u soo bixin, jidh aan dareemin milica cadceeda, san aan wali carfin udduga ubaxa, Haddana qaabaynaya nolosha uu ku noolaan lahaa, ka digtoon hagardaamooyinkii aad la kulantay, raba in uu qayrkii la tartamo raba in uu walaalkii jeclaado, raba in uu ku noolaado milgo iyo sharaf, raba in uu calankiisa kor u qaado, adduunku waa hadhkaa labadiisa galine shalay haddaad ku madhatay badaha waawayn maalin anigaa ku noolaan doona nolol aanad waxba iiga tagin. Aniga oo gacmaha is haysta aniga oo is jecel kuna midaysan fikrado bilaa turxaan ah. Aniga ayaa la dood dhigan doona caalamka intiisa kale, aniga ayaa la babac dhiganaya qayrkay.

Adiga kaagama baahni in aad i waaniso waayo waan ogahay xaalka aad ku sugantahay iyo taloda aad ka dhaxashay kuwii kaa horeyeeyay in ay midho dhal noqon wayday balse anigu safxad cusub oo nolosha ah ayaan bilaabanaya aniga ku bilaabi doona jacayl.

Waxaan arkaa saadaal wacan yididiilo cusub iyo qorax cusub oo ii dhalan doonta, farxad iyo jacayl u dhaxayn doona ummad iyo deegaankeed, Hooyo iyo ilmaheed, cadaalad ka soo if bixi doonta deegaan kharibnaa balse dhiig cusub lagu shubay. Waxaan noqon doonnaa tamar iyo awood cusub, cudud midaysan iyo nolol ii qalanta. Adiga waxaan kugula tallin lahaa in aanad is idhiibin ilaa aan ka imanayo in yar baa ka hadhee Hinji!


Nujum Ahmed Hashi (Artist) was born in Mogadishu, Somalia and raised there. She found herself interested in art at seven years of age, and used to draw on walls, in sand, and in her school books. On her way home from madrassa she often felt pressured from her older sister and school teachers; art became her skipping point to disconnect from her surroundings. That was the beginning of her journey to art.

Twitter@Nujumarts
Facebook: Nujuum.A.Hashi
Email: Nujuumhashi@gmail.com

Khaled M. Said (Author) is a young writer. He blogs at Khaloudym and has been published in WAAHEEN newspaper, among other local newspapers and websites. In 2016, Khaled worked for Jalada Pan-African Writers, based in Nairobi, where he contributed Somali translations to Africa’s most translated historical written works, including a Sanaa Theatre award-winner (2016) in the category of Best Play in Local Language.

Khaled graduated from the University of Hargeisa’s Department of Biomedical Science. He has a YouTube-based TV show called Xogmaal, He is an active member of the Saylici Festival Team, an annual festival of Somali traditional folklore dance in Hargeisa. Khaled is currently working with ILMO Aqoon publisher where he is a Chief Editor of children’s books.

Twitter: khaalid.said

Macooyo

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Nuura Axmed (Author & Artist) posts poetry and personal essays about identity, mental health, and travel at her blog Thoughts of a Big Head. Nuura is also a visual artist who focuses on the attire (hijab) of her subjects, and the overall mood of the piece, in lieu of emphasizing facial features. She enjoys taking photographs of her grandmother, and making digital edits on her phone. She resides in London.

Instagram: @wordsbynourz

Art, Untitled

dazmyart


HIMILO DARWISH (Artist) is a 23-year-old business student. She has been drawing since she can remember. Her artwork currently revolves around her identity as a Muslim, Somali, Black woman living in the UK. This piece of art is about a song that recently inspired her (Janelle Monea’s “Django Jane”), which discusses the Black woman and what she means to society: “In an era where being a Black women is still not widely appreciated, it’s great to hear music you can relate to.” Himilo resides in London.

Instagram: @dazmyart